Musky

Today, one of the traits most lacking in the wider world is patience. With so much happening so fast, we’ve come to expect things to be done in seconds – not hours. And, when things take too long, our first impulse is too often to get upset and frustrated. It’s a shame really. Things are not meant to be instantaneous. That’s a manufactured expectation reinforced daily by technology, but it’s not real in any way, shape, or form. A person is much better off if they accept the reality of time and come to grips with it on their own terms – before life makes it clear what it really means. Musky in Owl Lake can teach you this lesson in ways only nature can.

The largest fish in the lake, musky are fighters that know the value of struggle. They live for it. As loners with anger-management issues, they tend to grow large off of whatever they decide to catch and know nothing of fear or doubt. In this, they’re very much like you and will make the perfect opponent for those early mornings or late afternoons. You’ll find them in special places that only you’ll know and inevitably find yourself in your office on a Friday in June wondering if the big one has made its way into that one little cove you’ve had your eye on. You’ll know no peace until you’ve visited that cove and scoured it with your line for any glimpse of that monster you know lives down there. It may take years, but as the proud owner of Owl Lake, you’ve got all the time in the world. The musky taught you that.

Largemouth Bass

One of the real joys of owning this magnificent estate are the early May to late June mornings when the mist rises over the lake and the birds are just waking up and calling out to the newly-risen sun. It’s when life is at its most serene and the lake is another sky without so much as a ripple on its surface. Those are the mornings when you eat breakfast long before first light and await, coffee in-hand, the sunrise. Those are the mornings when the bass are biting. When you own Owl Lake Estate, those are your mornings.

Some prefer evenings, and that’s understandable. They’ll love the early September to mid-October evenings then. The sunsets are extraordinarily beautiful and you’ll never tire of the artistry displayed across the cool waters of Owl Lake. Take your ease aboard your bass boat as you leisurely cast in the cattails and brush for that perfect nook where you’re sure they’re hiding. With a wide range of structure and bottom conditions, they can find an array of hiding places, so you’ll have to try your range of lures to find the monster you know is waiting.

It’s a joy like no other to catch a story you can tell your friends for years to come. And never forget – a fish dinner at Le Bernardin may be exquisite, but it will never compare to a filet you caught yourself. Just ask Hemingway.

Walleye

Unlike other choices for a second home, where there’s one reason to buy, owning a piece of the natural world like Owl Lake Estate – replete with such diversity – is owning the right to entertain yourself in whatever way you choose – whenever you choose to do it. This very attitude, the same attitude that took you to the top, is what makes owning this piece of paradise so intriguing – limitless possibility. It’s not just a beach house – though it does have sand – or a skiing cabin. No, it’s much, much more and ever-changing to meet your tastes and inclinations. Like, for instance, the fishing. Or, te be far more precise, ice fishing for walleye on Owl Lake in early January.

Sure, the lake has its largemouth bass and musky, but if you want a thrill that’s a bit different, you’ll try your hand at walleye fishing all across the lake – in the heart of winter! Yes, what would owning a cabin in Wisconsin be without its ice fishing stories, so get your warm gear, grab your auger, and get out in your ice hut. It’s time to drop some tip-ups, jigs, and minnows into that ice hole and see what happens. If you’ve never done it, if you’ve never experienced the rush, you’re missing something extraordinary. Something so powerful in fact, that all the way back to Babylonia goes the saying, “The gods do not deduct from man’s allotted span the hours spent in fishing.” After all, bragging may not bring happiness, but no man having caught a large fish goes home through an alley.